User Tools

Site Tools


Translations of this page?:
en:tipitaka:sut:an:an03:an03.040.than

Preperation of htmls into ATI.eu currently in progress. Please visit the corresponding page at ZzE. If inspired to get involved in this merits here, one may feel invited to join best here: [ATI.eu] ATI/ZzE Content-style

Adhipateyya Sutta

<docinfo_head>

Title: Adhipateyya Sutta: Governing Principles

Summary: The Buddha describes three governing principles that keep one&#39;s Dhamma practice on-track. Beware: there&#39;s nowhere to hide from your unskillful actions.

/

AN 3.40

PTS: A i 147

					</div>

Adhipateyya Sutta: Governing Principles

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

<docinfo_head_end>

<p>“There are these three governing principles. Which three? The self as a governing principle, the cosmos as a governing principle, and the Dhamma as a governing principle.

“And what is the self as a governing principle? There is the case where a monk, having gone to a wilderness, to the foot of a tree, or to an empty dwelling, reflects on this: 'It is not for the sake of robes that I have gone forth from the home life into homelessness; it is not for the sake of almsfood, for the sake of lodgings, or for the sake of this or that state of [future] becoming that I have gone forth from the home life into homelessness. Simply that I am beset by birth, aging, & death; by sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs; beset by stress, overcome with stress, [and I hope,] “Perhaps the end of this entire mass of suffering & stress might be known!” Now, if I were to seek the same sort of sensual pleasures that I abandoned in going forth from home into homelessness — or a worse sort — that would not be fitting for me.' So he reflects on this: 'My persistence will be aroused & not lax; my mindfulness established & not confused; my body calm & not aroused; my mind centered & unified.' Having made himself his governing principle, he abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is unblameworthy, and looks after himself in a pure way. This is called the self as a governing principle.

And what is the cosmos as a governing principle? There is the case where a monk, having gone to a wilderness, to the foot of a tree, or to an empty dwelling, reflects on this: 'It is not for the sake of robes that I have gone forth from the home life into homelessness; it is not for the sake of almsfood, for the sake of lodgings, or for the sake of this or that state of [future] becoming that I have gone forth from the home life into homelessness. Simply that I am beset by birth, aging, & death; by sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs; beset by stress, overcome with stress, [and I hope,] “Perhaps the end of this entire mass of suffering & stress might be known!” Now if I, having gone forth, were to think thoughts of sensuality, thoughts of ill will, or thoughts of harmfulness: great is the community of this cosmos. And in the great community of this cosmos there are brahmans & contemplatives endowed with psychic power, clairvoyant, skilled [in reading] the minds of others. They can see even from afar. Even up close, they are invisible. With their awareness they know the minds of others. They would know this of me: “Look, my friends, at this clansman who — though he has in good faith gone forth from the home life into homelessness — remains overcome with evil, unskillful mental qualities.” There are also devas endowed with psychic power, clairvoyant, skilled [in reading] the minds of others. They can see even from afar. Even up close, they are invisible. With their awareness they know the minds of others. They would know this of me: “Look, my friends, at this clansman who — though he has in good faith gone forth from the home life into homelessness — remains overcome with evil, unskillful mental qualities.”' So he reflects on this: 'My persistence will be aroused & not lax; my mindfulness established & not confused; my body calm & not aroused; my mind centered & unified.' Having made the cosmos his governing principle, he abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is unblameworthy, and looks after himself in a pure way. This is called the cosmos as a governing principle.

And what is the Dhamma as a governing principle? There is the case where a monk, having gone to a wilderness, to the foot of a tree, or to an empty dwelling, reflects on this: 'It is not for the sake of robes that I have gone forth from the home life into homelessness; it is not for the sake of almsfood, for the sake of lodgings, or for the sake of this or that state of [future] becoming that I have gone forth from the home life into homelessness. Simply that I am beset by birth, aging, & death; by sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs; beset by stress, overcome with stress, [and I hope,] “Perhaps the end of this entire mass of suffering & stress might be known!” Now, the Dhamma is well-taught by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now, timeless, inviting all to come & see, pertinent, to be seen by the wise for themselves. There are fellow practitioners of the chaste life who dwell knowing & seeing it. If I — having gone forth in this well-taught Dhamma & Vinaya — were to remain lazy & heedless, that would not be fitting for me.' So he reflects on this: 'My persistence will be aroused & not lax; my mindfulness established & not confused; my body calm & not aroused; my mind centered & unified.' Having made the Dhamma his governing principle, he abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is unblameworthy, and looks after himself in a pure way. This is called the Dhamma as a governing principle.

“These are the three governing principles.”</p>

There is in the cosmos

       no
       secret
       place

for one who has done

       an
       evil
       deed.

Your own self knows, my good man, whether you are true

       or false.

You underestimate the fine witness

that is yourself,

you with evil

in yourself

that then you hide.

The devas & Tathagatas see the fool

who goes about
out of tune with the cosmos.

Thus you should go about self-governed,

       mindful;

governed by the cosmos,

       masterful,
       absorbed in jhana;

governed by the Dhamma,

       acting in line
       with the Dhamma.

The sage who makes an effort

   in truth
   doesn't fall back.

Whoever through striving

—  overpowering Mara,
conquering the Ender  —

touches the stopping of birth, is Such,

   a knower of the cosmos,
   wise,

a sage

   unfashioned
   with regard to all things.

<!– footer.inc.php –>

<!– #content –>

<a class='menu_l' href=“./an03.038.than_en.html” title=“go back AN 3.038”><img src=“./../../../img/left.png” alt='[previous page]'/></a><a class='menu_r' href=“./an03.045.than_en.html” title=“go to AN 3.045”><img src=“./../../../img/right.png” alt='[next page]'/></a>

<div id="F_colophon">

top

<b>Provenance:</b>

	<div id="F_sourceCopy">The source of this work is the gift within Access to Insight "Offline Edition 2012.09.10.14", last replication 12. March 2013, generously given by John Bullitt and mentioned as: ©1998 Thanissaro Bhikkhu.</div>
	<div id="F_sourceEdition"></div>
	<div id="F_sourceTitle">Transcribed from a file provided by the translator.</div>
	<div id="F_atiCopy">This Zugang zur Einsicht edition is <img width="8" src="./../../../img/d2.png" alt="[dana/©]" class='cd'/>2013-2014 (ATI 1998-2014).</div>
	<div id="F_zzeCopy">Translations, rebublishing, editing and additions are in the sphere of responsibility of <em>Zugang zur Einsicht</em>.</div>
</div>
<div id="F_termsOfUse"><b>Scope of this Dhamma-Gift:</b> You are invited to not only use this Dhamma-Gift here for yourself but also to share it, and your merits with it, again as a Dhamma gift and to copy, reformat, reprint, republish and redistribute this work in any medium whatsoever, provided that: (1) you only make such copies, etc. available <em>free of charge</em>; (2) you clearly indicate that any derivatives of this work (including translations) are derived from this source document; and (3) you include the full text of this "Scope of this Dhamma-Gift" in any copies or derivatives of this work. Anything beyond this is not given here.		For additional information about this license, see the [[en:faq#copyright|FAQ]].
</div>
<div id="F_citation"><b>How to cite this document</b> (one suggested style): "Adhipateyya Sutta: Governing Principles" (AN 3.40), translated from the Pali by  Thanissaro Bhikkhu. <i>Access to Insight</i>, 11 February 2012, [[http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an03/an03.040.than.html|http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an03/an03.040.than.html]] . Retrieved on 10 September 2012 (Offline Edition 2012.09.10.14), republished by <i>Zugang zur Einsicht</i> on &nbsp;

http://www.zugangzureinsicht.org/html/tipitaka/an/an03/an03.040.than_en.html retreived on: <script type=“text/javascript”>var d=new Date();document.write(d);</script><noscript>Your browser does not support JavaScript or the script for the file Name and date of the retrieving was blocked! Please enter the whole URL on http://zugangzureinsicht.org and add the date when reciting texts of this page.</noscript>

	<div id="F_alt-formats"><span style='font-weight:bold'></span></div>
</div> <!--  #colophon -->
</div><a id="more" href="#more" class="onclick" onclick="showHide(this);" title="Click here to get the whole infomation of this field and also to hide it again."><img src="./../../../img/more.png" alt="[show more]" />  [More]</a>

—- dataentry Met(t)a-Data —-


Anumodanā puñña kusala!

en/tipitaka/sut/an/an03/an03.040.than.txt · Last modified: 2018/11/14 04:26 by Johann