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Samyutta Nikaya

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Title: Samyutta Nikaya: The Grouped Discourses

Summary:

Samyutta Nikaya

The Grouped Discourses

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Quick links to the individual sections (vaggas) and chapters (samyuttas):

<table style='padding-left:3em'> <tr> <td style='text-align:right'>Sagatha Vagga:</td> <td>

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11

</td> </tr> <tr> <td style='text-align:right'>Nidana Vagga:</td> <td>

12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21

</td> </tr> <tr> <td style='text-align:right'>Khandha Vagga:</td> <td>

22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34

</td> </tr> <tr> <td style='text-align:right'>Salayatana Vagga:</td> <td>

35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44

</td> </tr> <tr> <td style='text-align:right'>Maha Vagga:</td> <td>

45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56

</td> </tr> </table>

The Samyutta Nikaya, the third division of the Sutta Pitaka, contains 2,889 suttas grouped into five sections (vaggas). Each vagga is further divided into samyuttas, each of which in turn contains a group of suttas on related topics. The samyuttas are named according to the topics of the suttas they contain. For example, the Kosala Samyutta (in the Sagatha Vagga) contains suttas concerning King Pasenadi of Kosala; the Vedana Samyutta (in the Salayatana Vagga) contains suttas concerning feeling (vedana); and so on.

An excellent modern print translation of the complete Samyutta Nikaya is Bhikkhu Bodhi's The Connected Discourses of the Buddha: A New Translation of the Samyutta Nikaya (Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2000; originally published in two volumes, but now available in a single volume). A fine anthology of selected suttas is Handful of Leaves (Vol. 2), by Thanissaro Bhikkhu (distributed by the Sati Center for Buddhist Studies).

The suttas are numbered here by samyutta (chapter) and sutta, with the suttas numbered sequentially from the start of each samyutta, using as a guide the Rhys Davis & Woodward PTS English translations of the Samyutta Nikaya (The Book of the Kindred Sayings). The braces {} that follow each sutta and samyutta title contain the corresponding volume and starting page number, first in the PTS romanized Pali edition of the Samyutta Nikaya, then in Bhikkhu Bodhi's Connected Discourses of the Buddha (“CDB”). The translator appears in the square brackets [].

See also this handy table for converting between traditional (DPR, CSCD) and modern (ATI, CDB) samyutta numbering systems.

Contents

Sagatha Vagga — The Section of Verses

Samyutta:

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11

1. Devata-samyutta — Devas

{S i 1; CDB i 89}

  • SN 1.20: Samiddhi Sutta — About Samiddhi/Samiddhi There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 8; CDB i 97} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    A devata wonders: why waste time meditating in the hopes of some future reward, when one can enjoy sensual pleasures right here and now?

2. Devaputta-samyutta — Sons of the Devas

{S i 46; CDB i 139}

3. Kosala-samyutta — King Pasenadi of Kosala

{S i 68; CDB i 164}

  • SN 3.25: Pabbatopama Sutta — Irresistible Force/The Simile of the Mountains There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 100; CDB i 192} [ Olendzki | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha offers a powerful simile to King Pasenadi to underscore the imminence of death and the urgency of Dhamma practice.

4. Mara-samyutta — Mara

{S i 103; CDB i 195}

Stories of Mara's attempts to outwit the Buddha.

5. Bhikkhuni-samyutta — Nuns

{S i 128; CDB i 221}

Stories of Mara's attempts to lure the nuns away from their meditation spots in the forest by asking them provocative questions. Without exception, these wise women conquer Mara decisively.

  • SN 5.1: Alavika Sutta — Alavika/Sister Alavika There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 128; CDB i 221} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara: Why bother meditating? Why not just relax and enjoy life's pleasures?

  • SN 5.2: Soma Sutta — Soma/Mara Meets His Match/Sister Soma There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 129; CDB i 222} [ Bodhi | Olendzki | Thanissaro ].

    Can women achieve Awakening? Ven. Sister Soma handles this misguided question with ease.

  • SN 5.3: Gotami Sutta — Gotami/Sister Gotami There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 129; CDB i 223} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara: Why bother sitting in solitude in the forest?

  • SN 5.4: Vijaya Sutta — Vijaya/Sister Vijaya There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 130; CDB i 224} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara: Why don't we just put aside the meditation for awhile and go out dancing?

  • SN 5.5: Uppalavanna Sutta — Uppalavanna/Sister Uppalavanna There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 131; CDB i 225} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara: Why don't you just give up the dangers of the forest and live somewhere safer?

  • SN 5.6: Cala Sutta — Cala/Sister Cala There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 132; CDB i 226} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara: What's wrong with being reborn, anyway?

  • SN 5.7: Upacala Sutta — Upacala/Sister Upacala There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 133; CDB i 227} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara: Why not just settle for a happy rebirth among the devas?

  • SN 5.8: Sisupacala Sutta — Sisupacala/Sister Sisupacala There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 133; CDB i 227} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Sister Sisupacala shows Mara how following the path of Dhamma doesn't mean buying into to a fixed philosophy.

  • SN 5.9: Sela Sutta — Sela/Sister Sela There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 134; CDB i 228} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Mara tries to trip up Ven. Sister Sela with metaphysical questions.

  • SN 5.10: Vajira Sutta — Vajira/Sister Vajira There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 134; CDB i 229} [ Bodhi | Thanissaro ].

    Have you ever found yourself getting lured out of meditation by some fascinating, but utterly speculative, train of thought? Ven. Sister Vajira shows how to deal with this.

6. Brahma-samyutta — Brahma deities

{S i 136; CDB i 231}

7. Brahmana-samyutta — Brahmans

{S i 160; CDB i 254}

  • SN 7.11: Kasi Bharadvaja Sutta — Discourse to Bharadvaja, the Farmer/To the Plowing Bharadvaja There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 171; CDB i 266} [ Piyadassi | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha answers a farmer who asserts that monks do no useful work, and thus don't deserve to eat.

  • SN 7.18: Katthaharaka Sutta — Buddha in the Forest/Firewood-gathering There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 180; CDB i 275} [ Olendzki | Thanissaro ].

    How does the Buddha practice jhana in the forest? [TB]

8. Vangisa-samyutta — Ven. Vangisa

{S i 185; CDB i 280}

9. Vana-samyutta — The forest

{S i 197; CDB i 294}

  • SN 9.14: Gandhatthena Sutta — Stealing the Scent/The Thief of a Scent There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 204; CDB i 303} [ Olendzki | Thanissaro ].

    Have you ever wished for a guardian angel to warn you before you do something foolish? Here's one with an important lesson.

10. Yakkha-samyutta — Yakkha demons

{S i 206; CDB i 305}

  • SN 10.12: Alavaka Sutta — Discourse to Alavaka/To the Alavaka Yakkha There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 213; CDB i 314} [ Piyadassi | Thanissaro ].

    A yakkha challenges the Buddha with riddles and threatens to beat him up.

11. Sakka-samyutta — Sakka (the Deva king)

{S i 216; CDB i 317}

  • SN 11.3: Dhajagga Sutta — Banner Protection/The Top of the Standard There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S i 218; CDB i 319} [ Piyadassi | Thanissaro ].

    Are you ever overcome by fear? The Buddha offers an antidote.

Nidana Vagga — The Section on Causation

Samyutta:

12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21

12. Nidana-samyutta — //Paticcasamuppada// (dependent co-arising)

{S ii 1; CDB i 533}

  • SN 12.12: Phagguna Sutta — To Phagguna There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 13; CDB i 541} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    Questions that presuppose the existence of an abiding “self,” are fundamentally invalid. The Buddha shows how to re-frame these questions in a way that conduces to liberation.

  • SN 12.15: Kaccayanagotta Sutta/Kaccaayanagotto Sutta — To Kaccayana Gotta (on Right View)/Kaccaayana There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 16; CDB i 544} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha explains to Ven. Kaccayana Gotta how dependent co-arising applies in the development of right view.

  • SN 12.31: Bhutamidam Sutta — This Has Come Into Being There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 47; CDB i 566} [ Thanissaro | Nyanaponika (excerpt) ].

    What characterizes the difference between a run-of-the-mill person, one who practices the Dhamma, and one who has fully realized the Dhamma?

  • SN 12.38: Cetana Sutta/Cetanaa Sutta — Intention/Volition There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 65; CDB i 576} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha explains the causal link between mental fabrications and consciousness.

  • SN 12.63: Puttamansa Sutta — A Son's Flesh There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 97; CDB i 597} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    A meditation on inter-relatedness, showing with four striking similes the suffering inherent in everything the body and mind depend upon for nourishment. [TB]

  • SN 12.64: Atthi Raga Sutta — Where There is Passion There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 101; CDB i 599} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha describes four factors to which the mind habitually clings. Those who succeed in abandoning passion for these “nutriments” can realize the cessation of birth, aging, and death.

13. Abhisamaya-samyutta — Realization

{S ii 133; CDB i 621}

  • SN 13.8: Samudda Sutta — The Ocean {S ii 137; CDB i 624} [ Thanissaro ].

    These three suttas offer vivid similes that give a sense of how much suffering one totally puts behind oneself upon attaining the stream to Nibbana. Good encouragement for putting some extra effort into the practice.

14. Dhatu-samyutta — Elements

{S ii 140; CDB i 627}

15. Anamatagga-samyutta — The unimaginable beginnings of samsara

{S ii 178; CDB i 651}

16. Kassapa-samyutta — Ven. Maha Kassapa

{S ii 194; CDB i 662}

  • SN 16.13: Saddhammapatirupaka Sutta/Saddhamma-pa.tiruupaka.m Sutta — A Counterfeit of the True Dhamma/False Dhamma There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 223; CDB i 680} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha issues a warning: a society that fails to show respect for these five things contributes to the eventual decline and disappearance of the Dhamma.

17. Labhasakkara-samyutta — Gains and tribute

{S ii 225; CDB i 682}

  • SN 17.5: Pilahaka Sutta/Piḷhika Sutta — The Dung Beetle There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S ii 228; CDB i 684} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    To seek fame and status: like carrying around a ball of dung.

18. Rahula-samyutta — Ven. Rahula

{S ii 244; CDB i 694}

19. Lakkhana-samyutta — Ven. Lakkhana

{S ii 254; CDB i 700}

20. Opamma-samyutta — Comparisons

{S ii 262; CDB i 706}

21. Bhikkhu-samyutta — Monks

{S ii 273; CDB i 713}

Khandha Vagga — The Section on the Aggregates

Samyutta:

22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34

22. Khandha-samyutta — The clinging-aggregates

{S iii 1; CDB i 853}

  • SN 22.22: Bhāra Sutta — The Burden There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 25; CDB i 871} [ Nizamis | Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha describes the burdens we carry, and how to cast them off.

  • SN 22.47: Samanupassana Sutta/Samanupassanaa Sutta — Assumptions/Ways of Regarding There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 46; CDB i 885} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha speaks on the assumptions that underlie self-view.

  • SN 22.58: Buddha Sutta — Awakened {S iii 65; CDB i 900} [ Thanissaro ].

    Some schools of Buddhism teach that there is a qualitative difference between the liberation of a Buddha and that of an arahant disciple — namely, that a Buddha awakens to one level of truth, whereas an arahant awakens to another. This sutta shows that the Buddha saw the distinction in different terms. [TB]

  • SN 22.59: Anatta-lakkhana Sutta/Pañcavaggi Sutta — The Discourse on the Not-self Characteristic/Five Brethren There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 66; CDB i 901} [ Mendis | Ñanamoli | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha's second discourse, in which he discusses the principle of anatta (not-self) with the group of five ascetics. By means of a question-and-answer dialogue with his audience, the Buddha demonstrates that there can be no abiding self in any of the five aggregates that we tend to identify as “self.” The sutta illustrates the Buddha's skillfulness as teacher: at the end of the discourse, all five monks attain full Awakening.

  • SN 22.60: Mahali Sutta — To Mahali {S iii 68; CDB i 903} [ Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha points out that attachment to things comes from paying more attention to the pleasure they give than to the stress and pain (dukkha) they cause. By turning your attention to the dukkha, however, you can gain release.

  • SN 22.80: Pindolya Sutta/Pi.n.dolya.m Sutta — Almsgoers/Going Begging There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 91; CDB i 918} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    A monk who is half-hearted in his meditation misses out on the rewards of both lay life and monastic life.

  • SN 22.84: Tissa Sutta/Tisso Sutta — Tissa/Tissa the Waverer There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 106; CDB i 929} [ Thanissaro | Walshe (excerpt) ].

    Ven. Tissa, mired in laziness, receives a wake-up call from the Buddha.

  • SN 22.86: Anuradha Sutta/Anuraadho Sutta — To Anuradha/Anuraadha is Caught Out There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 116; CDB i 936} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    Ven. Anuradha learns that if you can't even locate the Tathagata in space when he's sitting right in front of you, how can you ever hope to answer questions about his fate after death?

  • SN 22.89: Khemaka Sutta/Khemo Sutta — About Khemaka/Khemaka There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iii 126; CDB i 942} [ Thanissaro | Walshe (excerpt) ].

    Although dis-identification with the five aggregates is necessary for becoming a noble disciple, full Awakening calls for even more.

  • SN 22.93: Nadi Sutta — The River {S iii 137; CDB i 949} [ Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha explains that a person who incorrectly takes the five aggregates to be “self” is like a person swept away by a swift river, who grasps in vain at the passing trees and branches.

23. Radha-samyutta — Ven. Radha

{S iii 188; CDB i 984}

24. Ditthi-samyutta — Views

{S iii 202; CDB i 991}

25. Okkanta-samyutta — Entering

{S iii 225; CDB i 1004}

In this samyutta the Buddha explains the kinds of conviction and understanding that are required for the attainment of stream-entry. These short suttas share an identical structure, with each one focusing on a different aspect of experience (including the six senses, the six elements (dhatu), and the five aggregates). See also the Study Guides on stream-entry.

26. Uppada-samyutta — Arising

{S iii 228; CDB i 1008}

27. Kilesa-samyutta — Defilements

{S iii 232; CDB i 1012}

  • SN 27.1-10: Upakkilesa Samyutta — Defilements {S iii 232; CDB i 1012} [ Thanissaro ].

    These ten suttas explain why it is worth abandoning desire that is associated with: (1) the six sense bases; (2) their objects; (3) consciousness; (4) contact; (5) feeling; (6) perception; (7) intentions; (8) craving; (9) the six elements (earth, liquid, fire, wind, space, and consciousness); and (10) the five aggregates.

28. Sariputta-samyutta — Ven. Sariputta

{S iii 235; CDB i 1015}

29. Naga-samyutta — //Nagas//

{S iii 240; CDB i 1020}

30. Supanna-samyutta — //Garudas//

{S iii 246; CDB i 1023}

31. Gandhabbakaya-samyutta — Gandhabba devas

{S iii 249; CDB i 1025}

32. Valahaka-samyutta — Rain-cloud devas

{S iii 254; CDB i 1028}

33. Vacchagotta-samyutta — Ven. Vacchagotta

{S iii 257; CDB i 1031}

34. Jhana-samyutta — Concentration

{S iii 264; CDB i 1034}

Salayatana Vagga — The Section on the Six Sense Bases

Samyutta:

35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44

35. Salayatana-samyutta — The six senses

{S iv 1; CDB ii 1133}

  • SN 35.28: Adittapariyaya Sutta — The Fire Sermon There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 19; CDB ii 1143} [ Ñanamoli | Thanissaro ].

    Several months after his Awakening, the Buddha delivers this sermon to an audience of 1,000 fire-worshipping ascetics. The Buddha uses the metaphor of fire to illustrate the nature of clinging. Upon hearing the sermon, the entire audience attains full Awakening.

  • SN 35.63: Migajala Sutta/Migajaalena Sutta — To Migajala/Migajaala There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 35; CDB ii 1150} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    Why is true solitude so hard to find? The Buddha explains why, no matter where you go, your most annoying companions always tag along.

  • SN 35.95: Malunkyaputta Sutta/Maalunkyaputta Sutta — To Malunkyaputta/Maalunkyaputta There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 72; CDB ii 1175} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    An aging Ven. Malunkyaputta receives from the Buddha a short teaching regarding dispassion towards the senses (“In reference to the seen, there will be only the seen…”), and soon thereafter becomes an arahant.

  • SN 35.127: Bharadvaja Sutta/Bhaaradvaajo Sutta — About Bharadvaja/Bhaaradvaaja Instructs a King There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 110; CDB ii 1197} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    Ven. Pindola Bharadvaja explains to a king how to maintain one's resolve towards celibacy.

  • SN 35.145: Kamma Sutta/Kamma.m Sutta — Action/Kamma There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 132; CDB ii 1211 (corresponds to CDB SN 35.146)} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha explains how the results of “old” kamma (the actions we performed in the past) and “new” kamma (the ones we perform now) are both experienced in the present.

  • SN 35.191: Kotthita Sutta/Ko.t.thiko Sutta — To Kotthita/Ko.t.thika There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 162; CDB ii 1230 (corresponds to CDB SN 35.232)} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    Ven. Sariputta explains to Ven. Maha Kotthita that our problem lies neither in the senses themselves nor in the objects to which the senses cling. Suffering comes from the passion that arises in dependence on both.

  • SN 35.204: Kimsuka Sutta/Ki.msukaa Sutta — The Riddle Tree/The 'What's It' Tree (Ki.msuka) There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 191; CDB ii 1251 (corresponds to CDB SN 35.245)} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    The Buddha explains how tranquillity (samatha) and insight (vipassana) function together as a “swift pair of messengers” to guide the meditator onwards to Nibbana.

  • SN 35.205: Vina Sutta/Vii.naa Sutta — The Lute There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 195; CDB ii 1253 (corresponds to CDB SN 35.246)} [ Thanissaro | Walshe (excerpt) ].

    The heart of insight (vipassana): When you take apart a lute in search of its music, what do you find? When you take apart the five aggregates in search of “self,” what do you find?

  • SN 35.206: Chappana Sutta/Chapaa.na Sutta — The Six Animals There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 198; CDB ii 1255 (corresponds to CDB SN 35.247)} [ Thanissaro | Walshe (excerpt) ].

    The Buddha explains how training the mind is like keeping six unruly animals tied together on a leash.

36. Vedana-samyutta — Feeling

{S iv 204; CDB ii 1260}

(undated): Pali names for these suttas are from IBRIC BJT #1.20.1ff; English names for the suttas are either from Nyanaponika (WH 303) or PTS (“Kindred Sayings,” vol. IV. There is some discrepancy as to the number of suttas in this samyutta: PTS has 29 suttas, while IBRIC and WH 303 have 31. Nyanaponika uses some unusual translations of sutta titles (e.g., “Cessation” for #31 (Niramisa Sutta); following his translation in the text itself I'd've called it “Unworldly” ).

  • SN 36.4: Patala Sutta — The Bottomless Pit/The Bottomless Chasm There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 206; CDB ii 1262} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha teaches that by meeting intense physical pain with mindfulness, we can spare ourselves from falling into a bottomless pit of anguish and suffering.

  • SN 36.6: Sallatha Sutta — The Dart/The Arrow There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 207; CDB ii 1263} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    When shot by the arrow of physical pain, an unwise person makes matters worse by piling mental anguish on top of it, just as if he had been shot by two arrows. A wise person feels the sting of one arrow alone.

  • SN 36.7: Gelañña Sutta — At the Sick Room (1)/The Sick Ward (1) There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 210; CDB ii 1266} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha visits a sick ward, and offers advice to the monks on how to approach death with mindfulness.

  • SN 36.11: Rahogata Sutta — Secluded/Alone There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 216; CDB ii 1270} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha explains how the practice of jhāna leads to progressive stages of cessation and stillness. Only when the defilements are finally extinguished, however, is true peace and stillness achieved.

  • SN 36.13: Akasa Sutta — In the Sky (2) There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 219; CDB ii 1273}

<!– (no translator) –>

[This sutta repeats the prose section of the preceding sutta, without the verse.]

  • SN 36.16: Santaka Sutta — To Ananda There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 221; CDB ii 1274}

<!– (no translator) –>

[The Buddha puts to Ven. Ananda the same questions as in the preceding sutta, and answers them in the same way.]

  • SN 36.17-18: Atthaka Sutta — Eightfold (1 & 2) There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 221; CDB ii 1274}

<!– (no translator) –>

[In these two suttas the same questions and answers found in SN 36.15 are repeated in the case of “many monks.”]

  • SN 36.19: Pañcakanga Sutta — Carpenter Fivetools/With Pañcakanga There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 223; CDB ii 1274} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha describes the many kinds of happiness that can be experienced through sustained practice. Which kind of happiness do you seek?

  • SN 36.20: Bhikkhu Sutta — Monks There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 228; CDB ii 1278}

<!– (no translator) –>

[This discourse, addressed to some bhikkhus, repeats the main part of the preceding sutta, without its introductory section.]

  • SN 36.21: Sivaka Sutta — To Sivaka There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 230; CDB ii 1278} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha explains that present experience cannot be described solely in terms of the results of past actions (kamma).

  • SN 36.22: Atthasatapariyaya Sutta/Atthasata Sutta — One Hundred Eight Feelings/The One-hundred-and-eight Exposition There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 231; CDB ii 1280} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    A summary and enumeration of the different ways that the Buddha has analyzed feeling (hint: 3x6x6=108).

  • SN 36.30: Suddhikavedana Sutta — Purified of Feeling There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 235; CDB ii 1283}

<!– (no translator) –>

One of the shortest suttas in the Tipitaka. In its entirety it reads: “Bhikkhus, there are these three feelings. What three? Pleasant feeling, unpleasant feeling, and neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling.”]

  • SN 36.31: Niramisa Sutta — Unworldly/Not of the Flesh There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 235; CDB ii 1283} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha describes the various grades of potential happiness and freedom, ranging from the worldly to the transcendent.

37. Matugama-samyutta — Destinies of women

{S iv 238; CDB ii 1286}

  • SN 37.4: Vaddha Sutta — Growth {S iv 250; CDB ii 1293} [ Thanissaro ].

    This brief sutta, which encourages education for women, may account for the fact that in the pre-modern world Theravada Buddhist countries had the highest rates of female literacy. [TB]

38. Jambhukhadaka-samyutta — Jambhukhadaka the wanderer

{S iv 251; CDB ii 1294}

39. Samandaka-samyutta — Samandaka the wanderer

{S iv 261; CDB ii 1301}

40. Moggallana-samyutta — Ven. Moggallana

{S iv 261; CDB ii 1302}

41. Citta-samyutta — Citta the householder

{S iv 281; CDB ii 1314}

  • SN 41.6: Kamabhu Sutta — With Kamabhu (2) {S iv 293; CDB ii 1322} [ Thanissaro ].

    Ven. Kamabhu answers a layperson's detailed questions concerning cessation-attainment (nirodha-samapatti), a state of profound — and potentially liberating — concentration whose prerequisite is full mastery of the jhanas.

  • SN 41.10: Gilana Sutta/Gilaana-dassana.m Sutta — Sick/Seeing the Sick (Citta) There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S iv 302; CDB ii 1330} [ Thanissaro | Walshe ].

    While on his deathbed, Citta delivers an inspiring teaching on generosity to his friends, his family, and a gathering of devas.

42. Gamani-samyutta — Village headmen

{S iv 305; CDB ii 1332}

43. Asankhata-samyutta — The unfashioned //(Nibbana)//

{S iv 359; CDB ii 1372}

44. Avyakata-samyutta — Undeclared

{S iv 374; CDB ii 1380}

See Thanissaro Bhikkhu's Introduction to this samyutta.

Maha Vagga — The Great Section

Samyutta:

45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56

45. Magga-samyutta — The Noble Eightfold Path

{S v 1; CDB ii 1523}

  • SN 45.1: Avijja Sutta — Ignorance {S v 1; CDB ii 1523} [ Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha explains that ignorance is the cause of wrong view, wrong resolve, wrong speech, etc., whereas clear knowing gives rise to right view and all the factors of the eightfold path.

46. Bojjhanga-samyutta — The Seven Factors for Awakening

{S v 63; CDB ii 1567}

[See “The Seven Factors for Awakening” in The Wings to Awakening.]

  • SN 46.14: Gilana Sutta — Ill There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 79; CDB ii 1580} [ Piyadassi | Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha instructs a very ill Ven. Maha Kassapa on the seven Factors for Awakening.

  • SN 46.54: Metta Sutta/Mettam Sutta — Good Will/The Brahma-viharas There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 115; CDB ii 1607} [ Thanissaro | Walshe (excerpt) ].

    How to develop the four brahma-viharas.

47. Satipatthana-samyutta — The Four Frames of Reference (Foundations of Mindfulness)

{S v 141; CDB ii 1627}

[See “The Four Frames of Reference” in The Wings to Awakening.]

  • SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk {S v 146; CDB ii 1632} [ Thanissaro ].

    The Buddha uses a lovely parable — that of a hawk catching a quail far outside the quail's familiar hunting ground — to reveal the need for keeping the mind in its proper territory: the four frames of reference.

  • SN 47.7: Makkata Sutta — The Foolish Monkey/The Monkey There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 148; CDB ii 1633} [ Olendzki | Thanissaro ].

    Keep your mind in its proper territory — the four frames of reference — lest you lose it altogether, like this pitiful monkey stuck in a tar trap.

  • SN 47.10: Bhikkhunupassaya Sutta/Bhikkhunivasako Sutta — Directed and Undirected Meditation/Mindfulness There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 154; CDB ii 1638} [ Olendzki | Walshe (excerpt) ].

    How to respond skillfully to distracted states of mind that interfere with concentration.

  • SN 47.13: Cunda Sutta — About Cunda There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 161; CDB ii 1642} [ Nyanaponika | Thanissaro ].

    Ven. Ananda grieves over Ven. Sariputta's death, and the Buddha consoles him with Dhamma: make the Dhamma your island, your true refuge!

  • SN 47.19: Sedaka Sutta — The Bamboo Acrobat/At Sedaka There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 168; CDB ii 1648} [ Olendzki | Thanissaro ].

    Is meditation a selfish endeavor? Using a famous simile of two acrobats, the Buddha resolves this question decisively.

  • SN 47.20: Sedaka Sutta — At Sedaka {S v 169; CDB ii 1649} [ Thanissaro ].

    How solid is your concentration? Try this test, proposed by the Buddha: Can you keep a glass of oil balanced on your head while your favorite movie star is singing and dancing right in front of you?

48. Indriya-samyutta — The Five Mental Faculties

{S v 193; CDB ii 1668}

[See “The Five Faculties” in The Wings to Awakening.]

49. Sammappadhana-samyutta — The Four Right Exertions

{S v 244; CDB ii 1709}

[See “The Four Right Exertions” in The Wings to Awakening.]

50. Bala-samyutta — The Five Strengths

{S v 249; CDB ii 1713}

[See “The Five Strengths” in The Wings to Awakening.]

51. Iddhipada-samyutta — The Four Bases of Power

{S v 254; CDB ii 1718}

[See “The Four Bases of Power” in The Wings to Awakening.]

52. Anuruddha-samyutta — Ven. Anuruddha

{S v 294; CDB ii 1750}

53. Jhana-samyutta — Jhana (mental absorption)

{S v 307; CDB ii 1762}

54. Anapana-samyutta — Mindfulness of breathing

{S v 311; CDB ii 1765}

55. Sotapatti-samyutta — Stream-entry

{S v 342; CDB ii 1788}

56. Sacca-samyutta — The Four Noble Truths

{S v 414; CDB ii 1838}

  • SN 56.11: Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta — The Discourse on the Setting in Motion of the Wheel (of Vision) of the Basic Pattern: the Four True Realities for the Spiritually Ennobled Ones/Setting Rolling the Wheel of Truth/Setting in Motion the Wheel of Truth/Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion There is more than one translation! Click on the author-link below for the specific one of your choice. {S v 420; CDB ii 1843} [ Harvey | Ñanamoli | Piyadassi | Thanissaro ].

    This is the Buddha's first discourse, delivered shortly after his Awakening to the group of five monks with whom he had practiced the austerities in the forest for many years. The sutta contains the essential teachings of the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. Upon hearing this discourse, the monk Kondañña attains the first stage of Awakening, thus giving birth to the ariya sangha (Noble Sangha).

en/tipitaka/sut/sn/index.txt · Last modified: 2019/08/16 06:39 by Johann