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de:tipitaka:sut:kn:dhp:dhp.13.bpit [2019/09/03 09:42]
Johann div at end removed
de:tipitaka:sut:kn:dhp:dhp.13.bpit [2019/10/30 13:23] (aktuell)
Johann Title Changed
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 +<WRAP box fill ><​wrap info>​Info:</​wrap>​ Diese Gabe des Dhammas ist noch nicht (vollständig übersetzt). Fühlen Sie sich frei Ihre Verdienste zu teilen, gegeben mit einer zu versorgen, selbst wenn nur ein Teilabschnitt,​ oder sich in Vervollständigung und Verbesserung einzubringen,​ wenn inspiriert fühlend. //​(Bleistiftsymbol recht, wenn angemeldet ersichtlich,​ drücken um Text zu bearbeiten.//​ //​(Entfernen Sie diese Anmerkung sobald eine Übersetzung gegeben und ändern Sie die Division ''#​wrap_h_content_untranslated''​ in ''#​wrap_h_content''​ .)//</​WRAP>​
  
 +<div center round todo 60%>​**Preperation of htmls into ATI.eu currently in progress.** Please visite the corresponding page at [[http://​zugangzureinsicht.org/​html/​index_en.html|ZzE]]. If inspired to get involved in this merits here, one may feel invited to join best here: [[http://​sangham.net/​index.php/​topic,​8657.0.html|[ATI.eu] ATI/ZzE Content-style]]</​div>​
 +
 +====== Lokavagga ======
 +<span hide>​Lokavagga</​span>​
 +
 +Summary: ​
 +
 +
 +<div #h_meta>
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +<div #​h_tipitakaid>​Dhp XIII <span h_ptsid>​PTS:​ [[:​de:​tipitaka:​sltp:​Dhp_utf8#​v.167|Dhp 167-178]]</​span>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_doctitle>​Lokavagga</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docsubtitle2></​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docby>​übersetzt aus dem Pali von</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docauthor>​Daw Mya Tin</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docby2>​bearbeitet vom</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docauthor2>​Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docauthortransinfo>​Übersetzung ins Deutsche von:</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docauthortrans>​noch keine vorhanden, möchten Sie ihre teilen? ​  ​[[http://​sangham.net/​index.php?​action=post;​topic=589.0|{{de:​img:​letter.jpg?​30}}]]</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docauthortransalt>​Alternative Übersetzung:​ [[|noch keine vorhanden]]</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_copyright>​[[#​f_termsofuse|{{de:​img:​d2.png?​16x18}}]][[#​f_termsofuse| 2014-2018]]</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_docalttrans>​Alternate translations:​ [[de:​tipitaka:​sut:​kn:​dhp:​dhp.13x.olen|Olendzki]] | [[de:​tipitaka:​sut:​kn:​dhp:​dhp.13.than|Thanissaro]] | [[de:​tipitaka:​sut:​kn:​dhp:​dhp.13.budd|Buddharakkhita]]</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_altformat></​div>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​h_homage>​
 +
 +<div #​homagetext>​[[de:​homage|- ​ Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā-sambuddhassa ​ -]]</​div>​
 +
 +<div navigation></​div>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<span #​h_content_untranslated></​span>​
 +
 +<div alphalist>​
 +<span hlist> [[dhp.12.bpit|**←** Voriges Kapitel]] | [[dhp.14.bpit|Nächstes Kapitel **→**]] </​span>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Daharabhikkhu Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Hīnaṃ dhammaṃ na seveyya, ​
 +pamādena na saṃvase;
 +Micchādiṭṭhiṃ na seveyya, ​
 +na siyā lokavaḍḍhano.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-167>​**VERSE 167:​**</​span>​ Do not follow ignoble ways, do not live in negligence, do not embrace wrong views, do not be the one to prolong samsara (lit., the world).
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-167|Dhp 167]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Suddhodana Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Uttiṭṭhe nappamajjeyya, ​
 +dhammaṃ sucaritaṃ<​span notetag #​fnt-1>​([[#​fn-1|1]])</​span>​ care;
 +Dhammacārī sukhaṃ seti, 
 +asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-168>​**VERSE 168:​**</​span>​ Do not neglect the duty of going on alms-round; observe proper practice (in going on alms-round). One who observes proper practice lives happily both in this world and in the next.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-168-169|Dhp 168-169]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Suddhodana Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Dhammaṃ care sucaritaṃ, ​
 +na naṃ duccaritaṃ<​span notetag #​fnt-2>​([[#​fn-2|2]])</​span>​ care;
 +Dhammacārī sukhaṃ seti, 
 +asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-169>​**VERSE 169:​**</​span>​ Observe proper practice (in going on alms-round);​ do not observe improper practice. One who observes proper practice lives happily both in this world and in the next.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-168-169|Dhp 168-169]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Pancasatavipassakabhikkhu Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Yathā pubbuḷakaṃ passe, ​
 +yathā passe marīcikaṃ;​
 +Evaṃ lokaṃ avekkhantaṃ<​span notetag #​fnt-3>​([[#​fn-3|3]])</​span>;​
 +maccurājā na passati.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-170>​**VERSE 170:​**</​span>​ If a man looks at the world (i.e., the five khandhas) in the same way as one looks at a bubble or a mirage, the King of Death will not find him.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-170|Dhp 170]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Abhayarajakumara Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Etha passathimaṃ lokaṃ, ​
 +cittaṃ rājarathūpamaṃ;​
 +Yattha bālā visīdanti, ​
 +natthi saṅgo vijānataṃ.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-171>​**VERSE 171:​**</​span>​ Come, look at this world (i.e., the five //​khandhas//​),​ which is like an ornamented royal carriage. Fools flounder in this world of the </​i>​khandhas,​ but the wise are not attached to it.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-171|Dhp 171]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Sammajjanatthera Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Yo ca pubbe pamajjitvā, ​
 +pacchā so nappamajjati;​
 +Somaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti, ​
 +abbhā muttova candimā.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-172>​**VERSE 172:​**</​span>​ He, who has been formerly unmindful, but is mindful later on, lights up the world with the light of Magga Insight as does the moon freed from clouds.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-172|Dhp 172]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Angulimalatthera Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Yassa pāpaṃ kataṃ kammaṃ, ​
 +kusalena<​span notetag #​fnt-4>​([[#​fn-4|4]])</​span>​ pidhīyati;
 +Somaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti, ​
 +abbhā muttova candimā.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-173>​**VERSE 173:​**</​span>​ He who overwhelms with good the evil that he has done lights up this world (with the light of Magga Insight), as does the moon freed from clouds.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-173|Dhp 173]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Pesakaradhita Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Andhabhūto ayaṃ loko, 
 +tanukettha vipassati;
 +Sakuṇo jālamuttova, ​
 +appo saggāya gacchati.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-174>​**VERSE 174:​**</​span>​ Blind are the people of this world: only a few in this world see clearly (with Insight). Just as only a few birds escape from the net, so also, only a few get to the world of the devas, (and //​Nibbana//​).
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-174|Dhp 174]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Timsabhikkhu Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Haṃsādiccapathe yanti, ​
 +ākāse yanti iddhiyā;
 +Nīyanti dhīrā lokamhā, ​
 +jetvā māraṃ savāhiniṃ.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-175>​**VERSE 175:​**</​span>​ Swans travel in the sky; those with supernormal powers travel through space; the wise having conquered Mara together with his army, go out of this world (i.e., realize //​Nibbana//​).
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-175|Dhp 175]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Cincamanavika Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Ekaṃ dhammaṃ atītassa, ​
 +musāvādissa jantuno;
 +Vitiṇṇaparalokassa, ​
 +natthi pāpaṃ akāriyaṃ.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-176>​**VERSE 176:​**</​span>​ For one who transgresses the Truth, and is given to lying, and who is unconcerned with the life hereafter, there is no evil that he dare not do.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-176|Dhp 176]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Asadisadana Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Na ve kadariyā devalokaṃ vajanti, ​
 +bālā have nappasaṃsanti dānaṃ;
 +Dhīro ca dānaṃ anumodamāno, ​
 +teneva so hoti sukhī parattha.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-177>​**VERSE 177:​**</​span>​ Indeed, misers do not go to the abode of the devas; fools do not praise charity; but the wise rejoice in charity and so gain happiness in the life hereafter.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-177|Dhp 177]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +===== Anathapindikaputtakala Vatthu =====
 +
 +<div freeverse>​![<​span small>
 +Pathabyā ekarajjena, ​
 +saggassa gamanena vā;
 +Sabbalokādhipaccena, ​
 +sotāpattiphalaṃ varaṃ.
 +</​span>​
 +]!</​div>​
 +
 +<div verse>
 +
 +<span anchor #​dhp-178>​**VERSE 178:​**</​span>​ Far better than sovereignty over the earth, or far better than going to the abodes of the devas, or far better than ruling supreme over the entire universe, is (the attainment of) Sotapatti Fruition.
 +<​cite>​Story to [[#​s-dhp-178|Dhp 178]]</​cite>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<div chapter>
 +
 +<div alphalist>​
 +<span hlist> [[dhp.12.bpit|**←** Previous chapter]] | [[dhp.14.bpit|Next chapter **→**]] </​span>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of a Young Bhikkhu ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-167></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-167|167]]) of this book, with reference to a young bhikkhu.
 +
 +Once, a young bhikkhu accompanied an older bhikkhu to the house of Visakha. After taking rice gruel, the elder bhikkhu left for another place, leaving the young bhikkhu behind at the house of Visakha. The granddaughter of Visakha was filtering some water for the young bhikkhu, and when she saw her own reflection in the big water pot she smiled. Seeing her thus smiling, the young bhikkhu looked at her and he also smiled. When she saw the young bhikkhu looking at her and smiling at her, she lost her temper, and cried out angrily, "You, a shaven head! Why are you smiling at me ?" The young bhikkhu reported, "You are a shaven head yourself; your mother and your father are also shaven heads!"​ Thus, they quarrelled, and the young girl went weeping to her grandmother. Visakha came and said to the young bhikkhu, "​Please do not get angry with my grand daughter. But, a bhikkhu does have his hair shaved, his finger nails and toe nails cut, and putting on a robe which is made up of cut pieces, he goes on alms-round with a bowl which is rimless. What this young girl said was, in a way, quite right, is it not?" The young bhikkhu replied. "It is true but why should she abuse me on that account ?" At this point, the elder bhikkhu returned; but both Visakha and the old bhikkhu failed to appease the young bhikkhu and the young girl.
 +
 +Soon after this, the Buddha arrived and learned about the quarrel. The Buddha knew that time was ripe for the young bhikkhu to attain Sotapatti Fruition. Then, in order to make the young bhikkhu more responsive to his words, he seemingly sided with him and said to Visakha, "//​Visakha,​ what reason is there for your grand daughter to address my son as a shaven head just because he has his head shaven? After all, he had his head shaven to enter my Order, didn't he//?"
 +
 +Hearing these words, the young bhikkhu went down on his knees, paid obeisance to the Buddha, and said, "​Venerable Sir! You alone understands me; neither my teacher nor the great donor of the monastery understands me." The Buddha knew that the bhikkhu was then in a receptive mood and so he said, "//To smile with sensual desire is ignoble; it is not right and proper to have ignoble thoughts//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 167//__ Do not follow ignoble ways, do not live in negligence, do not embrace wrong views, do not be the one to prolong samsara (lit., the world). ​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +At the end of the discourse, the young bhikkhu attained Sotapatti Fruition.
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of King Suddhodana ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-168-169></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Nigrodharama monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses ([[#​dhp-168|168]]) and ([[#​dhp-169|169]]) of this book, with reference to King Suddhodana, father of Gotama Buddha.
 +
 +When the Buddha revisited Kapilavatthu for the first time he stayed at the Nigrodharama monastery. There, he expounded the Dhamma to his relatives. King Suddhodana thought that Gotama Buddha, who was his own son, would go to no other place, but would surely come to his palace for alms-food the next day; but he did not specifically invite the Buddha to come for alms-food. However, the next day, he prepared alms-food for twenty thousand bhikkhus. On that morning the Buddha went on his alms-round with a retinue of bhikkhus, as was the custom of all the Buddhas.
 +
 +Yasodhara, wife of Prince Siddhattha before he renounced the world, saw the Buddha going on an alms-round, from the palace window. She informed her father-in-law,​ King Suddhodana, and the King went in great haste to the Buddha. The king told the Buddha that for a member of the royal Khattiya family, to go round begging for food from door to door was a disgrace. Whereupon the Buddha replied that it was the custom of all the Buddhas to go round for alms-food from house to house, and therefore it was right and proper for him to keep up the tradition.
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 168//__ Do not neglect the duty of going on alms-round; observe proper practice (in going on alms-round). One who observes proper practice lives happily both in this world and in the next.
 +
 +__//Verse 169//__: Observe proper practice (in going on alms-round);​ do not observe improper practice. One who observes proper practice lives happily both in this world and in the next.
 +</​div>​
 +
 +At the end of the discourse the father of Gotama Buddha attained Sotapatti Fruition.
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Five Hundred Bhikkhus ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-170></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-170|170]]) of this book, with reference to five hundred bhikkhus.
 +
 +On one occasion, five hundred bhikkhus, after taking a subject of meditation from the Buddha, went into the forest to practise meditation. But they made very little progress; so they returned to the Buddha to ask for a more suitable subject of meditation. On their way to the Buddha, seeing a mirage they meditated on it. As soon as they entered the compound of the monastery, a storm broke out; as big drops of rain fell, bubbles were formed on the ground and soon disappeared. Seeing those bubbles, the bhikkhus reflected "This body of ours is perishable like the bubbles",​ and perceived the impermanent nature of the aggregates (//​khandhas//​).
 +
 +The Buddha saw them from his perfumed chamber and sent forth the radiance and appeared in their vision.
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 170//__ If a man looks at the world (i.e., the five //​khandhas//​) in the same way as one looks at a bubble or a mirage, the King of Death will not find him. 
 +</​div>​
 +
 +At the end of the discourse, those five hundred bhikkhus attained arahatship.
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Prince Abhaya ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-171></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Veluvana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-171|171]]) of this book, with reference to Prince Abhaya (Abhayarajakumara).
 +
 +On one occasion, Prince Abhaya triumphantly returned after suppressing a rebellion at the frontier. King Bimbisara was so pleased with him that for seven days, Abhaya was given the glory and honour of a ruler, together with a dancing girl to entertain him. On the last day, while the dancer was entertaining the prince and his company in the garden, she had a severe stroke; she collapsed and died on the spot. The prince was shocked and very much distressed. Sorrowfully,​ he went to the Buddha to find solace. To him the Buddha said, "//O prince, the tears you have shed all through the round of rebirths cannot be measured. This world of aggregates (i.e., khandhas) is the place where fools flounder//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 171//__ Come, look at this world (i.e., the five //​khandhas//​),​ which is like an ornamented royal carriage. Fools flounder in this world of the //​khandhas//,​ but the wise are not attached to it. 
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Thera Sammajjana ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-172></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-172|172]]) of this book, with reference to Thera Sammajjana.
 +
 +Thera Sammajjana spent most of his time sweeping the precincts of the monastery. At that time, Thera Revata was also staying at the monastery; unlike Sammajjana, Thera Revata spent most of his time in meditation or deep mental absorption. Seeing Thera Revata'​s behaviour, Thera Sammajjana thought the other thera was just idling away his time. Thus, one day Sammajjana went to Thera Revata and said to him, "You are being very lazy, living on the food offered out of faith and generosity; don't you think you should sometimes sweep the floors or the compound or some other place?"​ To him, Thera Revata replied, "​Friend,​ a bhikkhu should not spend all his times sweeping. He should sweep early in the morning, then go out on the alms-round. After the meal, contemplating his body he should try to perceive the true nature of the aggregates, or else, recite the texts until nightfall. Then he can do the sweeping again if he so wishes."​ Thera Sammajjana strictly followed the advice given by Thera Revata and soon attained arahatship.
 +
 +Other bhikkhus noticed some rubbish piling up in the compound and they asked Sammajjana why he was not sweeping as much as he used to, and he replied, "When I was not mindful, I was all the time sweeping; but now I am no longer unmindful."​ When the bhikkhus heard his reply they were sceptical; so they went to the Buddha and said, "​Venerable Sir! Thera Sammajjana falsely claims himself to be an arahat; he is telling lies." To them the Buddha said, "//​Sammajjana has indeed attained arahatship; he is telling the truth//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 172//__ He, who has been formerly unmindful, but is mindful later on, lights up the world with the light of Magga Insight as does the moon freed from clouds. ​
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Thera Angulimala ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-173></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-173|173]]) of this book, with reference to Thera Angulimala.
 +
 +Angulimala was the son of the Head Priest in the court of King Pasenadi of Kosala. His original name was Ahimsaka. When he was of age, he was sent to Taxila, a renowned university town. Ahimsaka was intelligent and was also obedient to his teacher. So he was liked by the teacher and his wife; as a result, other pupils were jealous of him. So they went to the teacher and falsely reported that Ahimsaka was having an affair with the teacher'​s wife. At first, the teacher did not believe them, but after being told a number of times he believed them; and so he vowed to have revenge on the boy. To kill the boy would reflect badly on him; so he thought of a plan which was worse than murder. He told Ahimsaka to kill one thousand men or women and in return he promised to give the boy priceless knowledge. The boy wanted to have this knowledge, but was very reluctant to take life. However, he agreed to do as he was told.
 +
 +Thus, he kept on killing people, and not to lose count, he threaded a finger each of everyone he killed and wore them like a garland round his neck. In this way, he was known as Angulimala, and became the terror of the countryside. The king himself heard about the exploits of Angulimala, and he made preparations to capture him. When Mantani, the mother of Angulimala, heard about the king's intention, out of love for her son, she went into the forest in a desperate bid to save her son. By this time, the chain round the neck of Angulimala had nine hundred and ninety-nine fingers in it, just one finger short of one thousand.
 +
 +Early in the morning on that day, the Buddha saw Angulimala in his vision, and reflected that if he did not intervene, Angulimala who was on the look out for the last person to make up the one thousand would see his mother and might kill her. In that case, Angulimala would have to suffer in niraya endlessly. So out of compassion, the Buddha left for the forest where Angulimala was.
 +
 +Angulimala, after many sleepless days and nights, was very tired and near exhaustion. At the same time, he was very anxious to kill the last person to make up his full quota of one thousand and so complete his task. He made up his mind to kill the first person he met. Suddenly, as he looked out he saw the Buddha and ran after him with his knife raised. But the Buddha could not be reached while he himself was completely exhausted. Then, looking at the Buddha, he cried out, "O bhikkhu, stop! stop!" and the Buddha replied, "I have stopped, only you have not stopped."​ Angulimala did not get the significance of the words of the Buddha, so he asked, "O Bhikkhu! Why do you say that you have stopped and I have not stopped?"​
 +
 +//The Buddha then said to him, "I say that I have stopped, because I have given up killing all beings, I have given up ill-treating all beings, and because I have established myself in universal love, patience, and knowledge through reflection. But, you have not given up killing or ill-treating others and you are not yet established in universal love and patience. Hence, you are the one who has not stopped//​."​ On hearing these words from the mouth of the Buddha, Angulimala reflected, "These are the words of a wise man. This bhikkhu is so very wise and so very brave ; he must be the ruler of the bhikkhus. Indeed, he must be the Buddha himself! He must have come here specially to make me see the light."​ So thinking, he threw away his weapon and asked the Buddha to admit him to the Order of the bhikkhus. Then and there, the Buddha made him a bhikkhu.
 +
 +Angulimala'​s mother looked for her son everywhere in the forest shouting out his name, but failing to find him she returned home. When the king and his men came to capture Angulimala, they found him at the monastery of the Buddha. Finding that Angulimala had given up his evil ways and had become a bhikkhu, the king and his men went home. During his stay at the monastery, Angulimala ardently and diligently practised meditation, and within a short time he attained arahatship.
 +
 +Then, one day, while he was on an alms-round, he came to a place where some people were quarrelling among themselves. As they were throwing stones at one another, some stray stones hit Thera Angulimala on the head and he was seriously injured. Yet, he managed to come back to the Buddha, and the Buddha said to him, "//My son Angulimala! You have done away with evil. Have patience. You are paying in this existence for the deeds you have done. These deeds would have made you suffer for innumerable years in niraya//​."​ Soon afterwards, Angulimala passed away peacefully; he had realized parinibbana.
 +
 +Other bhikkhus asked the Buddha where Angulimala was reborn, and when the Buddha replied "//My son has realized parinibbana//",​ they could hardly believe it. So they asked him whether it was possible that a man who had killed so many people could have realized parinibbana. To this question, the Buddha replied, "//​Bhikkhus! Angulimala had done much evil because he did not have good friends. But later, he found good friends and through their help and good advice he had been steadfast and mindful in his practice of the dhamma. Therefore, his evil deeds have been overwhelmed by good// (i e., //Arahatta Magga//).
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 173//__ He who overwhelms with good the evil that he has done lights up this world (with the light of //Magga// Insight), as does the moon freed from clouds. ​
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of the Weaver-Girl ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-174></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the monastery near Aggavala shrine in the country of Alavi, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-174|174]]) of this book, with reference to a young maiden, who was a weaver.
 +
 +At the conclusion of an alms-giving ceremony in Alavi, the Buddha gave a discourse on the impermanence of the aggregates (//​khandhas//​). The main points the Buddha stressed on that day may be expressed as follows:
 +
 +"//My life is impermanent;​ for me, death only is permanent. I must certainly die; my life ends in death. Life is not permanent; death is permanent//​."​
 +
 +The Buddha also exhorted the audience to be always mindful and to strive to perceive the true nature of the aggregate. He also said,"//​As one who is armed with a stick or a spear is prepared to meet an enemy (e.g. a poisonous snake), so also, one who is ever mindful of death will face death mindfully. He would then leave this world for a good destination (sugati)//​."​ Many people did not take the above exhortation seriously, but a young girl of sixteen who was a weaver clearly understood the message. After giving the discourse, the Buddha returned to the Jetavana monastery.
 +
 +After a lapse of three years, when the Buddha surveyed the world, he saw the young weaver in his vision, and knew that time was ripe for the girl to attain Sotapatti Fruition. So the Buddha came to the country of Alavi to expound the dhamma for the second time. When the girl heard that the Buddha had come again with five hundred bhikkhus, she wanted to go and listen to the discourse which would be given by the Buddha. However, her father had also asked her to wind some thread spools which he needed urgently, so she promptly wound some spools and took them to her father. On the way to her father, she stopped for a moment at the outer fringe of the audience, who had come to listen to the Buddha.
 +
 +Meanwhile, the Buddha knew that the young weaver would come to listen to his discourse; he also knew that the girl would die when she got to the weaving shed. Therefore, it was very important that she should listen to the Dhamma on her way to the weaving shed and not on her return. So, when the young weaver appeared on the fringe of the audience, the Buddha looked at her. When she saw him looking at her, she dropped her basket and respectfully approached the Buddha. Then, he put four questions to her and she answered all of them. The questions and answers are as given below.
 +
 +Questions   Answers
 +
 +|(1) Where have you come from?​|</​td>​   <​td>​(1) I do not know.|
 +|(2) Where are you going?​|</​td>​   <​td>​(2) I do not know.|
 +|(3) Don't you know?​|</​td>​   <​td>​(3) Yes, I do know.|
 +|(4) Do you know?​|</​td>​   <​td>​(4) I do not know, Venerable Sir.|
 +
 +Hearing her answers, the audience thought that the young weaver was being very disrespectful. Then, the Buddha asked her to explain what she meant by her answers, and she explained.
 +
 +"​Venerable Sir! Since you know that I have come from my house, I interpreted that, by your first question, you meant to ask me from what past existence I have come here. Hence my answer, 'I do not know.' The second question means, to what future existence I would be going from here; hence my answer, 'I do not know.' The third question means whether I do not know that I would die one day; hence my answer, 'yes, I do know.' The last question means whether I know when I would die; hence my answer, 'I do not know.
 +
 +The Buddha was satisfied with her explanation and he said to the audience, "//​Most of you might not understand clearly the meaning of the answers given by the young weaver. Those who are ignorant are in darkness, they are just like the blind//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 174//__ Blind are the people of this world: only a few in this world see clearly (with Insight). Just as only a few birds escape from the net, so also, only a few get to the world of the devas, (and Nibbana). ​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +At the end of the discourse, the young weaver attained Sotapatti Fruition.
 +
 +Then, she continued on her way to the weaving shed. When she got there, her father was asleep on the weaver'​s seat. As he woke up suddenly, he accidentally pulled the shuttle, and the point of the shuttle struck the girl at her breast. She died on the spot, and her father was broken-hearted. With eyes full of tears he went to the Buddha and asked the Buddha to admit him to the Order of the bhikkhus. So, he became a bhikkhu, and not long afterwards, attained arahatship.
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Thirty Bhikkhus ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-175></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-175|175]]) of this book, with reference to thirty bhikkhus.
 +
 +Once, thirty bhikkhus came to pay homage to the Buddha. When they came in, the Venerable Ananda, who was then attending on the Buddha, left the room and waited outside. After some time, Thera Ananda went in, but he did not find any of the bhikkhus. So, he asked the Buddha where all those bhikkhus had gone. The Buddha then replied, "//​Ananda,​ all those bhikkhus, after hearing my discourse, had attained arahatship, and with their supernormal powers, they let travelling through space//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 175//__ Swans travel in the sky; those with supernormal powers travel through space; the wise having conquered Mara together with his army, go out of this world (i.e., realize Nibbana). ​
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Cincamanavika ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-176></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-176|176]]) of this book, with reference to Cincamanavika.
 +
 +As the Buddha went on teaching the Dhamma, more and more people came flocking to him, and the ascetics of other faiths found their following to be dwindling. So they made a plan that would harm the reputation of the Buddha. They called the very beautiful Cincamanavika,​ a devoted pupil of theirs, to them and said to her, "If you have our interests in your heart, please help us and put Samana Gotama to shame."​ Cincamanavika agreed to comply.
 +
 +That same evening, she took some flowers and went in the direction of the Jetavana monastery. When people asked her where she was going, she replied, "What is the use of you knowing where I am going?"​ Then she would go to the place of other ascetics near the Jetavana monastery and would come back early in the morning to make it appear as if she had spent the night at the Jetavana monastery. When asked, she would reply, "I spent the night with Samana Gotama at the Perfumed Chamber of the Jetavana monastery."​ After three or four months had passed, she wrapped up her stomach with some cloth to make her look pregnant. Then, after eight or nine months, she wrapped up her stomach with a round piece of thin wooden plank; she also beat up her palms and feet to make them swollen, and pretended to be feeling tired and worn out. Thus, she assumed a perfect picture of a woman in an advanced stage of pregnancy. Then, in the evening, she went to the Jetavana monastery to confront the Buddha.
 +
 +The Buddha was then expounding the Dhamma to a congregation of bhikkhus and laymen. Seeing him teaching on the platform, she accused the Buddha thus: "O you big Samana! You only preach to others. I am now pregnant by you, yet you do nothing for my confinement. You only know how to enjoy your self!" The Buddha stopped preaching for a while and said to her, "//​Sister,​ only you and I know whether you are speaking the truth or not//,"​ and Cincamanavika replied, "//​Yes,​ you are right, how can others know what only you and I kno?//"​
 +
 +At that instant, Sakka, king of the devas, became aware of the trouble being brewed at the Jetavana monastery, so he sent four of his devas in the form of young rats. The four rats got under the clothes of Cincamanavika and bit off the strings that fastened the wooden plank round her stomach. As the strings broke, the wooden plank dropped, cutting off the front part of her feet. Thus, the deception of Cincamanavika was uncovered, and many from the crowd cried out in anger, "Oh you wicked woman! A liar and a cheat! How dare you accuse our noble Teacher!"​ Some of them spat on her and drove her out. She ran as fast as she could, and when she had gone some distance the earth cracked and fissured and she was swallowed up.
 +
 +The next day, while the bhikkhus were talking about Cincamanavika,​ the Buddha came to them and said. "//​Bhikkhu;,​ one who is not afraid to tell lies, and who does not care what happens in the future existence, will not hesitate to do any evil//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 176//__ For one who transgresses the Truth, and is given to lying, and who is unconcerned with the life hereafter, there is no evil that he dare not do. 
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of the Unrivalled Alms-Giving ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-177></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-177|177]]) of this book, with reference to the unrivalled alms-giving of King Pasenadi of Kosala.
 +
 +Once, the king offered alms to the Buddha and other bhikkhus on a grand scale. His subjects, in competition with him, organized another alms-giving ceremony on a grander scale than that of the king. Thus, the king and his subjects kept on competing in giving alms. Finally, Queen Mallika thought of a plan; to implement this plan, she asked the king to have a grand pavilion built. Next, she asked for five hundred white umbrellas and five hundred tame elephants; those five hundred elephants were to hold the five hundred white umbrellas over the five hundred bhikkhus. In the middle of the pavilion, they kept ten boats which were filled with perfumes and incense. There were also two hundred and fifty princesses, who kept fanning the five hundred bhikkhus. Since the subjects of the king had no princesses, nor white umbrellas, nor elephants, they could no longer compete with the king. When all preparations were made, alms-food was offered. After the meal, the king made an offering of all the things in the pavilion, which were worth fourteen crores.
 +
 +At the time, two ministers of the king were present. Of those two, the minister named Junha was very pleased and praised the king for having offered alms so generously to the Buddha and his bhikkhus. He also reflected that such offerings could only be made by a king. He was very glad because the king would share the merit of his good deeds with all beings. In short, the minister Junha rejoiced with the king in his unrivalled charity. The minister Kala, on the other hand, thought that the king was only squandering,​ by giving away fourteen crores in a single day, and that the bhikkhus would just go back to the monastery and sleep.
 +
 +After the meal, the Buddha looked over at the audience and knew how Kala the minister was feeling. Then, he thought that if he were to deliver a lengthy discourse of appreciation,​ Kala would get more dissatisfied,​ and in consequence would have to suffer more in his next existence. So, out of compassion for Kala, the Buddha delivered only a short discourse and returned to the Jetavana monastery. The king had expected a lengthy discourse of appreciation,​ and so he was very sad because the Buddha had been so brief. The king wondered if he had failed to do something which should have been done, and so he went to the monastery.
 +
 +On seeing the king, the Buddha said, "//​Great King! You should rejoice that you have succeeded in making the offering of the unrivalled charity (asadisadana). Such an opportunity comes very rarely; it comes only once during the appearance of each Buddha. But your minister Kala had felt that it was a waste, and was not at all appreciative. So, if I had given a lengthy discourse, he would get more and more dissatisfied and uncomfortable,​ and in consequence,​ he would suffer much more in the present existence as well as in the next. That was why I preached so briefly//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha added, "//​Great King! Fools do not rejoice in the charities given by others and go to the lower worlds. The wise rejoice in other people'​s charities and through appreciation,​ they share in the merit gained by others and go to the abode of the devas//"​.
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 177//__ Indeed, misers do not go to the abode of the devas; fools do not praise charity; but the wise rejoice in charity and so gain happiness in the life hereafter. ​
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== The Story of Kala, son of Anathapindika ======
 +<div chapter>
 +<span anchor #​s-dhp-178></​span>​
 +
 +While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse ([[#​dhp-178|178]]) of this book, with reference to Kala, son of Anathapindika,​ the well renowned rich man of Savatthi.
 +
 +Kala, son of Anathapindika,​ always kept away whenever the Buddha and his company of bhikkhus came to their house. Anathapindika was afraid that if his son kept on behaving in this way, he would be reborn in one of the lower worlds (apayas). So, he enticed his son with the promise of money. He promised to give one hundred if the youth consented to go to the monastery and keep sabbath for one day. So, the youth went to the monastery and returned home early the next day, without listening to any religious discourses. His father offered him rice gruel, but instead of taking his food, he first demanded to have the money.
 +
 +The next day, the father said to his son, "My son, if you learn a stanza of the Text from the Buddha I will give you one thousand on your return."​ So, Kala went to the monastery again, and told the Buddha that he wanted to learn something. The Buddha gave him a short stanza to learn by heart; at the same time he willed that the youth would not be able to memorize it. Thus, the youth had to repeat a single stanza many times, but because he had to repeat it so many times, in the end, he came to perceive the full meaning of the Dhamma and attained Sotapatti Fruition.
 +
 +Early on the next morning, he followed the Buddha and the bhikkhus to his own house. But on that day, he was silently wishing, "I wish my father would not give me the one thousand in the presence of the Buddha. I do not wish the Buddha to know that I kept the sabbath just for the sake of money."​ His father offered rice gruel to the Buddha and the bhikkhus, and also to him. Then, his father brought one thousand, and told Kala to take the money but surprisingly he refused. His father pressed him to take it, but he still refused. Then, Anathapindika said to the Buddha, "​Venerable Sir, my son is quite changed; he now behaves in a very pleasant manner."​ Then he related to the Buddha how he had enticed the youth with money to go to the monastery and keep sabbath and to learn some religious texts. To him the Buddha replied, "//​Anathapindika! Today, your son has attained Sotapatti Fruition, which is much better than the riches of the Universal Monarch or that of the devas or that of the brahmas//​."​
 +
 +Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:
 +
 +<div verse>
 +__//Verse 178//__ Far better than sovereignty over the earth, or far better than going to the abodes of the devas, or far better than ruling supreme over the entire universe, is (the attainment of) Sotapatti Fruition. ​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +End of Chapter Thirteen: The World (Lokavagga)
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<div chapter>
 +
 +<div alphalist>​
 +<span hlist> [[dhp.12.bpit|**←** Previous chapter]] | [[dhp.14.bpit|Next chapter **→**]] </​span>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +====== Notes ======
 +<div notes>
 +<span anchor #​notes></​span>​
 +
 +<dl>
 +
 +  ? <span fn #​fn-1>​[[#​fnt-1|1]]</​span>​.
 +  :: //dhammam sucaritam//:​ proper practice. The Commentary says that here proper practice means stopping for alms-food at one house after another in the course of the alms-round except where it is not proper to go (such as a courtesan'​s house).
 +
 +  ? <span fn #​fn-2>​[[#​fnt-2|2]]</​span>​.
 +  :: //na nam duccaritam//:​ improper practice. Here it means not observing the above rules.
 +
 +  ? <span fn #​fn-3>​[[#​fnt-3|3]]</​span>​.
 +  :: //evam jokam avekkhantam//:​ one who looks at the world in the same way, i.e., looks at the world as being impermanent as a bubble and as non-material as a mirage.
 +
 +  ? <span fn #​fn-4>​[[#​fnt-4|4]]</​span>​.
 +  :: //​kusalena//:​ with good deed; the good in this context means Arahatta Magga, the fourth and final Path knowledge. (The Commentary)
 +
 +</dl>
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<span #​h_content_end></​span>​
 +
 +<div #​f_footer>​
 +
 +<div showmore>​
 +<div #​f_colophon>​
 +<div #​f_newcopyrightsymbol>​[[#​top| ]]</​div>​
 +<div #​f_provenance>​**Herkunft:​**
 +<div #​f_sourceCopy>​[[de:​dhamma-dana|{{de:​img:​d2.png?​8}}]] 1986 Daw Mya Tin, Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_sourceCopy_translation></​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_sourceEdition>​Letzte Revision: mr, 21. Februar 2017</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_sourceTitle>​Aus //Der Dhammapada: Verse and Erzählungen//,​ übersetzt aus dem Pali von Daw Mya Tin, M.A. und zusammengestellt vom Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association Rangoon, Burma, 1986. Großzügig abgeschrieben mit Zustimmung von Herrn U Maung Lwin für das Dhamma-Dana-Projekt [[http://​www.nibbana.com|www.nibbana.com]] und als Dhamma-Dana zum weiterteilen auf ZzE gegeben.</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_atiCopy>​Diese Ausgabe von Zugang zur Einsicht ist [[de:​dhamma-dana|{{de:​img:​d2.png?​8}}]]2014-2015.</​div>​
 +
 +<div f_zzecopy>​Übersetzungen,​ Publizierungen,​ Änderungen und Ergänzungen liegen im Verantwortungsbereich von //Zugang zur Einsicht//​.</​div>​
 +
 +</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_termsofuse>​**Umfang des Dhamma-Geschenkes:​ **Sie sind eingeladen, dieses Dhamma-Geschenk hier, und Ihre Verdienste damit, neben der eigenen Verwendung auch wieder als Dhamma-Geschenk zu vervielfachen (Anumodana) und in jedes dafür passende Medium zu kopieren, es umzuformatieren,​ zu drucken, publizieren und zu verteilen, vorausgesetzt:​ (1) Sie machen Kopien usw. verfügbar, //ohne eine Gegenleistung//​ zu verlangen; (2) Sie kennzeichnen klar, daß jedes Ergebnis aus dieser Arbeit (inkl. Übersetzungen) aus diesem Dokument stammt; und (3) Sie fügen diesen hier angeführten "​Umfang des Dhamma-Geschenkes"​ jeder Kopie oder Abwandlung aus diesem Werk bei. Alles, was darüber hinaus geht, ist hier nicht gegeben. Für eine ausführliche Erklärung, siehe [[de:​faq#​copyright|FAQ]].</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_citation>​**Wie das Dokument anzuführen ist** (ein Vorschlag): "​Lokavagga"​ (Dhp XIII), übersetzt aus dem Pali von Daw Mya Tin (Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association). //Zugang zur Einsicht//, 17 März 2014, [[http://​www.zugangzureinsicht.org/​html/​tipitaka/​kn/​dhp/​dhp.13.bpit.html|http://​www.zugangzureinsicht.org/​html/​tipitaka/​kn/​dhp/​dhp.13.bpit.html]] . 
 + Zitat entnommen am: 
 +"​date"</​div>​
 +
 +<div #​f_alt-formats>​****</​div>​
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 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +</​div>​
 +
 +----
 +
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