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en:dictionary:uddhacca



uddhacca {pi}


Pāḷi; √ uddhacca
gender:
type:
alt. sp.: IPA: ud̪d̪ʰət͡ʃt͡ʃə, Velthuis: uddhacca, readable: uddhachcha, simple: uddhacca
translation ~:
skr.:
khmer: ឧទ្ធច្ច
thai: อุทฺธจฺจ
sinhal.: උද්ධච්ච
burm.: ဥဒ္ဓစ္စ
appears:



uddhachcha.jpg

[dic] uddhacca

uddhacca: Description welcome. Info can be removed after imput.

ATI Glossary

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Buddhist Dictionary

by late Ven. Nyanalokita Thera:

uddhacca: 'restlessness', belongs to the 10 fetters (see saṁyojana), and to the 5 hindrances (see nīvaraṇa). It is one of those 4 mental factors inseparably associated with all unwholesome consciousness (see akusala-sādhārana ). Cf. Table II.

 

PTS Dictionary

by the Pali Text Society:

 

Glossary Thanissaro

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Illustrated Glossary of Pāli Terms

by Ven. Varado Maha Thera:

Renderings
Introduction

The problem of uddhacca

The problem of uddhacca is illustrated in Bodhi’s rendering of uddhacca, both the fourth hindrance and the ninth fetter, as ‘restlessness,’ and Norman’s rendering both cases as ‘conceit’ (e.g. Thi 167, Tha 1010, Tha 760).

Strangely, DOP does not recognise ‘conceit’ for uddhacca in spite of accepting ‘puffed up’ for uddhata, and acknowledging that uddhacca is derived from uddhata.

The problem with restlessness

The five hindrances are hindrances to samādhi, and non-returners have perfect samādhi (samādhismiṁ paripūrakārī hoti, AN i 232) which implies that the five hindrances including uddhacca are insignificant in non-returners. And yet non-returners are still troubled by uddhacca the ninth fetter. So the two forms of uddhacca must be different, and it is unlikely that the restlessness of the fourth hindrance is also the ninth fetter.

The problem with conceit

But Norman’s suggestion is also problematic, because it implies that the hindrance to first jhāna would remain active until arahantship, when the ninth tie to individual existence is finally abandoned. Unless conceit can be temporarily quelled like lust and hatred, first jhāna would only be available to arahants. So again, uddhacca must have two meanings.

Double meanings of uddhata and capala

Part of the confusion is that both uddhata and capala which frequently occur together, have double meanings, as follows:

Grouping 1:

Grouping 2:

  • uddhata: vain
  • capala: puffed up

Uddhata and capala: illustrated

The meanings of uddhacca and capala can be illustrated as follows:

1) uddhata: restless

• When one’s mind is restless it is timely to develop the enlightenment factors of tranquillity, inward collectedness, and detached awareness.

Yasmiṁ bhikkhave samaye uddhataṁ cittaṁ hoti kālo tasmiṁ samaye passaddhisambojjhaṅgassa bhāvanāya(SN v 115)

2) capala: fluttery

• Like a fletcher straightens an arrow, the wise man straightens up his unsteady, fluttery mind, which is hard to supervise, hard to restrain.

Phandanaṁ capalaṁ cittaṁ durakkhaṁ dunnivārayaṁ
Ujuṁ karoti medhāvī usukāro va tejanaṁ. (Dhp 33)

3) uddhato: vain; capalo: puffed up

• A vain, puffed up bhikkhu clothed in rag-robes does not look glorious because of it. He is like a monkey in a lion-skin.

Uddhato capalo bhikkhu paṁsukūlena pāruto
Kapīva sīhacammena na so tenupasobhati. (Tha 1080)

4) uddhato: vain; capalo: puffed up

• Because of improper contemplation I was addicted to finery. I was vain, puffed up, and afflicted by lust for sensuous pleasure.

Ayoniso manasikārā maṇḍanaṁ anuyuñjisaṁ
Uddhato capalo cāsiṁ kāmarāgena aṭṭito. (Tha 157)

Dutiya Anuruddha Sutta: tranquility and peace are not ‘restlessness’

An interesting muddle occurs in the Dutiya Anuruddha Sutta (AN i 282), where Venerable Anuruddha complained about his slowness in attaining arahantship in spite of outstanding spiritual qualities. Venerable Sāriputta told him:

• ’Anuruddha, when you say “With purified divine vision surpassing that of men, I survey the thousandfold multi-universe system,” that is your self-centredness (māna).

Yaṁ kho te āvuso anuruddha evaṁ hoti: evāhaṁ dibbena cakkhunā visuddhena atikkantamānusakena sahassaṁ lokaṁ olokemī ti idante mānasmiṁ.

… ‘When you say “My unflagging energy is aroused, unmuddled mindfulness is established, my body is tranquil and peaceful, my mind is collected and concentrated,” that is your vanity (uddhacca).

Yampi te āvuso anuruddha evaṁ hoti: āraddhaṁ kho pana me viriyaṁ asallīnaṁ upaṭṭhitā sati apammuṭṭhā passaddho kāyo asāraddho samāhitaṁ cittaṁ ekaggan ti idante uddhaccasmiṁ

… ‘When you say “But for all that my mind is not liberated from perceptually obscuring states through being without grasping,” that is your fretting (kukkucca).

Yampi te āvuso anuruddha evaṁ hoti atha ca pana me na anupādāya āsavehi cittaṁ vimuccatī ti idante kukkuccasmiṁ. (AN i 282)

It makes little sense to say that claiming one’s body is tranquil and peaceful can be explained as restlessness (uddhacca), as Bodhi puts it. DOP’s suggestion ‘puffed up’ is preferable, using ‘vanity’ as the noun for ‘puffed-upness.’

Causes of the fourth hindrance

The causes of uddhacca, the fourth hindrance, are:

  • 1) Excessive exertion: if a meditator focuses excessively on the practice of effort, it leads to restlessness (ekantaṁ paggahanimittaññeva manasikareyya ṭhānaṁ taṁ cittaṁ uddhaccāya saṁvatteyya). The suttas say it is like a goldsmith who, if he blows too much on molten gold will simply burn it up.
  • 2) No inward collectedness: Just as the goldsmith should sprinkle gold with water to keep it cool, the meditator should from time to time focus on the practice of inward collectedness (kālena kālaṁ samādhinimittaṁ manasikātabbaṁ) (AN i 256) or inward peacefulness (cetaso vūpasamo) (SN v 106) because this removes restlessness (uddhaccassa pahānāya samatho bhāvetabbo) (AN iii 449).
  • 3) Argumentative speech (viggāhikakathaṁ): this leads to overtalkativeness (kathābāhullaṁ). With overtalkativeness comes restlessness (kathābāhulle sati uddhaccaṁ) (AN iv 87).

Agitation

Occasionally uddhacca means ‘agitation’, not restlessness. For example, the Buddha said a bhikkhu should visit families in a humble manner, lest he be embarrassed if he receives nothing:

• And so, from getting nothing, he becomes embarrassed

Itissa alābhena maṅkubhāvo.

… Being embarrassed, he becomes agitated

… Being agitated, his sense faculties are unrestrained [from grasping, through mindfulness]

uddhatassa asaṁvaro. (AN iv 87)

Righteous disquietude: dhammuddhacca

One form of uddhacca is called righteous disquietude (dhammuddhacca). It comprises the fourth path to arahantship. The first three paths are:

• insightfulness preceded by inward calm

• inward calm preceded by insightfulness

• inward calm together with insightfulness

The fourth path is described as follows:

• Or a bhikkhu’s mind is seized by righteous disquietude

bhikkhuno dhammuddhaccaviggahītaṁ mānaṁ hoti

… But there comes a time when his mind becomes settled, calm, concentrated, and collected.

so samayo yantaṁ cittaṁ ajjhattaṁyeva santiṭṭhati sannisīdati ekodi hoti samādhiyati.

… In him the path is born

tassa maggo sañjāyati. (AN ii 157)

Therefore dhammuddhacca is abandoned at stream-entry when the path is born, because:

• One possessed of this noble eightfold path, bhante, is called a stream-enterer.

Yo hi bhante iminā ariyena aṭṭhaṅgikena maggena samannāgato ayaṁ vuccati sotāpanno. (SN v 348)

Dhammuddhacca: a synonym for saṁvega

Dhammuddhacca is perhaps a synonym for saṁvega. It could therefore be illustrated by this account of practice:

• Seeing sensuous pleasures as [dangerous as] a blazing [grass torch being carried against the wind], and gold pieces as [dangerous as a sharp] knife, and life from the time of conception as suffering, and great danger in the [possibility of the] hells,

Kāme ādittato disvā jātarūpāni satthato
Gabbhavokkantito dukkhaṁ nirayesu mahabbhayaṁ.

… Recognising this danger, I was filled with an earnest attitude [to the practice].

Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā saṁvegaṁ alabhiṁ tadā

… I was quickened then peaceful. I have accomplished the destruction of perceptually obscuring states.

Sohaṁ viddho tadā santo sampatto āsavakkhayaṁ. (Tha 790-1)

COMMENT

Norman has said (Elders’ Verses note 791) that ‘it is possible that viddha is the equivalent of vyathita, the past participle of vyath- “shaken.” The context supports us treating it as standing for the past participle of saṁvijjati, to be quickened.

Illustrations

Illustration: uddhacca, restlessness; anuddhato, not restless

Abandoning restlessness and anxiety, he abides not restless, with a mind inwardly at peace. He purifies his mind of restlessness and anxiety.

uddhaccakukkuccaṁ pahāya anuddhato viharati ajjhattaṁ vūpasantacitto. Uddhaccakukkuccā cittaṁ parisodheti. (MN i 521)

There is inward unpeacefulness. Much improper contemplation in that regard is a condition that nourishes both the arising of unarisen restlessness and anxiety, and the increase and expansion of arisen restlessness and anxiety.

Atthi bhikkhave cetaso avūpasamo. Tattha ayoniso manasikārabahulīkāro ayamāhāro anuppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa uppādāya uppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya.

There is inward peacefulness. Much proper contemplation in that regard is not a condition that nourishes either the arising of unarisen restlessness and anxiety, or the increase and expansion of arisen restlessness and anxiety.

Atthi bhikkhave cetaso vūpasamo. Tattha yoniso manasikārabahulīkāro ayamanāhāro anuppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa uppādāya uppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya. (SN v 105-6)

And what is investigation that is too lax?

It is investigation accompanied by indolence, conjoined with indolence. This is called investigation that is too lax.

yā bhikkhave vīmaṁsā kosajjasahagatā kosajjasampayuttā. Ayaṁ vuccati bhikkhave atilīnā vīmaṁsā.

And what is investigation that is too strained?

It is investigation accompanied by restlessness, conjoined with restlessness. This is called investigation that is too strained.

yā bhikkhave vīmaṁsā uddhaccasahagatā uddhaccasampayuttā. Ayaṁ vuccati bhikkhave atipaggahitā vīmaṁsā. (SN v 280)

Suppose, brahman, there is a bowl of water stirred by wind. If a clear-sighted man were to examine his facial reflection in it, he would neither discern nor see it according to reality.

So too, brahman, when one dwells with a mind absorbed in and overcome by restlessness and anxiety, and does not discern according to reality the deliverance from the arisen restlessness and anxiety, one does not know or see either one’s own well-being, or that of others, or that of both.

yasmiṁ samaye uddhaccakukkuccapariyuṭṭhitena cetasā viharati uddhaccakukkuccaparetena uppannassa ca uddhaccakukkuccassa nissaraṇaṁ yathābhūtaṁ nappajānāti. (SN v 123-4)

uddhaccāya

uddhaccāya: (main article see: uddhacca)

Illustration: uddhaccāya, restlessness

If one’s energy is excessive it leads to restlessness; if too lax it leads to indolence.

accāraddhaṁ viriyaṁ uddhaccāya saṁvattati atilīnaṁ viriyaṁ kosajjāya saṁvattati. (AN iii 376)

uddhataṁ

uddhataṁ: (main article see: uddhacca)

Illustration: uddhataṁ, restless

When one’s mind is restless (uddhataṁ cittaṁ) it is timely to develop the enlightenment factors of tranquillity, inward collectedness, and detached awareness.

Yasmiṁ bhikkhave samaye uddhataṁ cittaṁ hoti kālo tasmiṁ samaye passaddhisambojjhaṅgassa bhāvanāyasamādhisambojjhaṅgassa… upekkhāsambojjhaṅgassa bhāvanāya

For what reason? Because the mind is restless and it is easy to calm it with those things

uddhataṁ bhikkhave cittaṁ. Taṁ etehi dhammehi suvūpasamaṁ hoti. (SN v 115)

uddhatā

uddhatā: (main article see: uddhacca)

Illustration: uddhatā, restless

These people say, “We are study bhikkhus, we are study bhikkhus,' but they are restless, frivolous, fidgety, talkative, garrulous, unmindful, not fully conscious, inwardly uncollected, mentally scattered, [and are dwelling with] their sense faculties unrestrained [from grasping, through mindfulness].

ime pana dhammayogamhā dhammayogamhā ti uddhatā unnaḷā capalā mukharā vikiṇṇavācā muṭṭhassatī asampajānā asamāhitā vibbhantacittā pākatindriyā. (AN iii 355)

Illustration: uddhatā, vain

They will be vain, clothed in blue robes, deceitful, puffed up, talkative, and haughty. They will live the religious life as though they were Noble Ones.

Uddhatā ca bhavissanti nīlacīvarapārutā
Kuhā thaddhā lapā siṅgī carissantyariyā viya. (Tha 958)

uddhaccaṁ

uddhaccaṁ: (main article see: uddhacca)

Illustration: uddhaccaṁ, agitated

When there is contentious talk, an excess of words can be expected. When there is an excess of words, one becomes agitated. When one is agitated, one’s sense faculties are unrestrained [from grasping, through mindfulness].

Viggāhikāya moggallāna kathāya sati kathābāhullaṁ pāṭikaṅkhaṁ. Kathābāhulle sati uddhaccaṁ. Uddhatassa asaṁvaro. (SN iv 87)

Illustration: uddhaccaṁ, vanity

Bhikkhus, there are these five ties to individual existence in the middle and high planes of existence. What five?

pañcimāni bhikkhave uddhambhāgiyāni saṁyojanāni. katamāni pañca?

• attachment to the refined material states of awareness

• attachment to immaterial states of awareness

• self-centredness

• vanity

• uninsightfulness into reality

uddhaccasmiṁ

uddhaccasmiṁ: (main article see: uddhacca)

Illustration: uddhaccasmiṁ, vanity

• ’Anuruddha, friend, when you say “With purified divine vision surpassing that of men, I survey the thousandfold multi-universe system,” that is your self-centredness.

Yaṁ kho te āvuso anuruddha evaṁ hoti: evāhaṁ dibbena cakkhunā visuddhena atikkantamānusakena sahassaṁ lokaṁ olokemī ti idante mānasmiṁ.

‘When you say “My unflagging energy is aroused, unmuddled mindfulness is established, my body is tranquil and peaceful, my mind is collected and concentrated,” that is your vanity.

Yampi te āvuso anuruddha evaṁ hoti: āraddhaṁ kho pana me viriyaṁ asallīnaṁ upaṭṭhitā sati apammuṭṭhā passaddho kāyo asāraddho samāhitaṁ cittaṁ ekaggan ti idante uddhaccasmiṁ

‘When you say “But for all that my mind is not liberated from perceptually obscuring states through being without grasping,” that is your fretting.

Yampi te āvuso anuruddha evaṁ hoti atha ca pana me na anupādāya āsavehi cittaṁ vimuccatī ti idante kukkuccasmiṁ. (AN i 282)

uddhato

uddhato: (main article see: uddhacca)

Illustration: uddhato, vain

A vain, puffed up bhikkhu clothed in rag-robes does not look glorious because of it. He is like a monkey in a lion-skin.

Uddhato capalo bhikkhu paṁsukūlena pāruto
Kapīva sīhacammena na so tenupasobhati. (Tha 1080)

One who is not vain or puffed up, who is mindful, whose sense faculties are restrained [from grasping, through mindfulness], looks glorious in rag-robes. He is like a lion in a mountain cave.

Anuddhato acapalo nipako saṁvutindriyo
Sobhati paṁsukūlena sīho va girigabbhare. (Tha 1081)

Because of improper contemplation I was addicted to finery. I was vain, puffed up, and afflicted by lust for sensuous pleasure.

Ayoniso manasikārā maṇḍanaṁ anuyuñjisaṁ
Uddhato capalo cāsiṁ kāmarāgena aṭṭito. (Tha 157)

 

Glossary various Teacher

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See also

Suttas and Dhammadesanā

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en/dictionary/uddhacca.txt · Last modified: 2019/09/25 05:30 (external edit)